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Reading Comprehension Test Questions

It is unfortunate that the government seems determined to introduce legal provisions to ensure that children between the ages of 16 and 18 are tried as adults if they commit heinous offences such as murder and rape. Ever since a juvenile offender was given a ‘light’ sentence in the Delhi gang rape case of 2012 under the existing child-friendly laws, there has been a clamour to treat juveniles involved in heinous crimes as adults.

A fresh Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill introduced in the Lok Sabha last year contained clauses that many child rights activists and groups disapproved of. A Standing Committee of Parliament recommended a review and reconsideration of all clauses that sought to carve out an exception for children in the 16-18 age group and subject them to the rigours of regular criminal procedure. However, the amended Bill now cleared by the Cabinet retains the clause that provides that when a heinous crime is committed by one in this age group, the Juvenile Justice Board will assess whether the crime has been committed as a ‘child’ or as an ‘adult’. The trial would take place on the basis of this assessment. The present framework classifies offences as petty, serious and heinous and treats each category under a different process. The government claims that since this assessment will be done with the help of psychologists and social experts, the rights of the juvenile would be protected. It remains to be seen if enough numbers of such professionals would be available across the country to make this work.

It should not be forgotten that making children face an adult criminal court would mar the prospect of their rehabilitation. The Supreme Court has not seen any special reason to amend the present juvenile law. Nor did the Justice J.S. Verma Committee, which made far- reaching recommendations on the legal framework for treating sexual offences, suggest such changes. The government should stick by the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which treats everyone up to 18 as a child. To the government's credit, it has held some consultations with stakeholders before finalising its latest draft. It has heeded the Parliamentary Committee’s objection to Clause 7, and dropped the arbitrary provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21 would be treated and tried as an adult. However, this is not enough. The government would do well to drop its attempt to have a differential system for those involved in ‘heinous offences’. Instead, it should pursue the other forward-looking aspects of the bill, which has welcome features for the care and protection of children that can help them significantly through provisions such as those for foster homes and a better-regulated adoption mechanism.


Refer the above for the Questions 1721 to 1720
1721. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “rigours”?




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Correct Ans:diligence
Explanation:
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It is unfortunate that the government seems determined to introduce legal provisions to ensure that children between the ages of 16 and 18 are tried as adults if they commit heinous offences such as murder and rape. Ever since a juvenile offender was given a ‘light’ sentence in the Delhi gang rape case of 2012 under the existing child-friendly laws, there has been a clamour to treat juveniles involved in heinous crimes as adults.

A fresh Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill introduced in the Lok Sabha last year contained clauses that many child rights activists and groups disapproved of. A Standing Committee of Parliament recommended a review and reconsideration of all clauses that sought to carve out an exception for children in the 16-18 age group and subject them to the rigours of regular criminal procedure. However, the amended Bill now cleared by the Cabinet retains the clause that provides that when a heinous crime is committed by one in this age group, the Juvenile Justice Board will assess whether the crime has been committed as a ‘child’ or as an ‘adult’. The trial would take place on the basis of this assessment. The present framework classifies offences as petty, serious and heinous and treats each category under a different process. The government claims that since this assessment will be done with the help of psychologists and social experts, the rights of the juvenile would be protected. It remains to be seen if enough numbers of such professionals would be available across the country to make this work.

It should not be forgotten that making children face an adult criminal court would mar the prospect of their rehabilitation. The Supreme Court has not seen any special reason to amend the present juvenile law. Nor did the Justice J.S. Verma Committee, which made far- reaching recommendations on the legal framework for treating sexual offences, suggest such changes. The government should stick by the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which treats everyone up to 18 as a child. To the government's credit, it has held some consultations with stakeholders before finalising its latest draft. It has heeded the Parliamentary Committee’s objection to Clause 7, and dropped the arbitrary provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21 would be treated and tried as an adult. However, this is not enough. The government would do well to drop its attempt to have a differential system for those involved in ‘heinous offences’. Instead, it should pursue the other forward-looking aspects of the bill, which has welcome features for the care and protection of children that can help them significantly through provisions such as those for foster homes and a better-regulated adoption mechanism.


Refer the above for the Questions 1722 to 1721
1722. Which of the following is not true according to the passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Parliamentary Committee’s approved the provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21
Explanation:
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It is unfortunate that the government seems determined to introduce legal provisions to ensure that children between the ages of 16 and 18 are tried as adults if they commit heinous offences such as murder and rape. Ever since a juvenile offender was given a ‘light’ sentence in the Delhi gang rape case of 2012 under the existing child-friendly laws, there has been a clamour to treat juveniles involved in heinous crimes as adults.

A fresh Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill introduced in the Lok Sabha last year contained clauses that many child rights activists and groups disapproved of. A Standing Committee of Parliament recommended a review and reconsideration of all clauses that sought to carve out an exception for children in the 16-18 age group and subject them to the rigours of regular criminal procedure. However, the amended Bill now cleared by the Cabinet retains the clause that provides that when a heinous crime is committed by one in this age group, the Juvenile Justice Board will assess whether the crime has been committed as a ‘child’ or as an ‘adult’. The trial would take place on the basis of this assessment. The present framework classifies offences as petty, serious and heinous and treats each category under a different process. The government claims that since this assessment will be done with the help of psychologists and social experts, the rights of the juvenile would be protected. It remains to be seen if enough numbers of such professionals would be available across the country to make this work.

It should not be forgotten that making children face an adult criminal court would mar the prospect of their rehabilitation. The Supreme Court has not seen any special reason to amend the present juvenile law. Nor did the Justice J.S. Verma Committee, which made far- reaching recommendations on the legal framework for treating sexual offences, suggest such changes. The government should stick by the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which treats everyone up to 18 as a child. To the government's credit, it has held some consultations with stakeholders before finalising its latest draft. It has heeded the Parliamentary Committee’s objection to Clause 7, and dropped the arbitrary provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21 would be treated and tried as an adult. However, this is not enough. The government would do well to drop its attempt to have a differential system for those involved in ‘heinous offences’. Instead, it should pursue the other forward-looking aspects of the bill, which has welcome features for the care and protection of children that can help them significantly through provisions such as those for foster homes and a better-regulated adoption mechanism.


Refer the above for the Questions 1723 to 1722
1723. Which of the following is true according to the passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:The cabinet has cleared the new form of bill
Explanation:
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It is unfortunate that the government seems determined to introduce legal provisions to ensure that children between the ages of 16 and 18 are tried as adults if they commit heinous offences such as murder and rape. Ever since a juvenile offender was given a ‘light’ sentence in the Delhi gang rape case of 2012 under the existing child-friendly laws, there has been a clamour to treat juveniles involved in heinous crimes as adults.

A fresh Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill introduced in the Lok Sabha last year contained clauses that many child rights activists and groups disapproved of. A Standing Committee of Parliament recommended a review and reconsideration of all clauses that sought to carve out an exception for children in the 16-18 age group and subject them to the rigours of regular criminal procedure. However, the amended Bill now cleared by the Cabinet retains the clause that provides that when a heinous crime is committed by one in this age group, the Juvenile Justice Board will assess whether the crime has been committed as a ‘child’ or as an ‘adult’. The trial would take place on the basis of this assessment. The present framework classifies offences as petty, serious and heinous and treats each category under a different process. The government claims that since this assessment will be done with the help of psychologists and social experts, the rights of the juvenile would be protected. It remains to be seen if enough numbers of such professionals would be available across the country to make this work.

It should not be forgotten that making children face an adult criminal court would mar the prospect of their rehabilitation. The Supreme Court has not seen any special reason to amend the present juvenile law. Nor did the Justice J.S. Verma Committee, which made far- reaching recommendations on the legal framework for treating sexual offences, suggest such changes. The government should stick by the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which treats everyone up to 18 as a child. To the government's credit, it has held some consultations with stakeholders before finalising its latest draft. It has heeded the Parliamentary Committee’s objection to Clause 7, and dropped the arbitrary provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21 would be treated and tried as an adult. However, this is not enough. The government would do well to drop its attempt to have a differential system for those involved in ‘heinous offences’. Instead, it should pursue the other forward-looking aspects of the bill, which has welcome features for the care and protection of children that can help them significantly through provisions such as those for foster homes and a better-regulated adoption mechanism.


Refer the above for the Questions 1724 to 1723
1724. Choose an appropriate title for the passage.




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Unequal scales for juveniles
Explanation:
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It is unfortunate that the government seems determined to introduce legal provisions to ensure that children between the ages of 16 and 18 are tried as adults if they commit heinous offences such as murder and rape. Ever since a juvenile offender was given a ‘light’ sentence in the Delhi gang rape case of 2012 under the existing child-friendly laws, there has been a clamour to treat juveniles involved in heinous crimes as adults.

A fresh Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill introduced in the Lok Sabha last year contained clauses that many child rights activists and groups disapproved of. A Standing Committee of Parliament recommended a review and reconsideration of all clauses that sought to carve out an exception for children in the 16-18 age group and subject them to the rigours of regular criminal procedure. However, the amended Bill now cleared by the Cabinet retains the clause that provides that when a heinous crime is committed by one in this age group, the Juvenile Justice Board will assess whether the crime has been committed as a ‘child’ or as an ‘adult’. The trial would take place on the basis of this assessment. The present framework classifies offences as petty, serious and heinous and treats each category under a different process. The government claims that since this assessment will be done with the help of psychologists and social experts, the rights of the juvenile would be protected. It remains to be seen if enough numbers of such professionals would be available across the country to make this work.

It should not be forgotten that making children face an adult criminal court would mar the prospect of their rehabilitation. The Supreme Court has not seen any special reason to amend the present juvenile law. Nor did the Justice J.S. Verma Committee, which made far- reaching recommendations on the legal framework for treating sexual offences, suggest such changes. The government should stick by the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which treats everyone up to 18 as a child. To the government's credit, it has held some consultations with stakeholders before finalising its latest draft. It has heeded the Parliamentary Committee’s objection to Clause 7, and dropped the arbitrary provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21 would be treated and tried as an adult. However, this is not enough. The government would do well to drop its attempt to have a differential system for those involved in ‘heinous offences’. Instead, it should pursue the other forward-looking aspects of the bill, which has welcome features for the care and protection of children that can help them significantly through provisions such as those for foster homes and a better-regulated adoption mechanism.


Refer the above for the Questions 1725 to 1724
1725. What does the author mean by the phrase “forward-looking aspects of the bill”?




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Correct Ans:Future Facet of the bill
Explanation:
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It is unfortunate that the government seems determined to introduce legal provisions to ensure that children between the ages of 16 and 18 are tried as adults if they commit heinous offences such as murder and rape. Ever since a juvenile offender was given a ‘light’ sentence in the Delhi gang rape case of 2012 under the existing child-friendly laws, there has been a clamour to treat juveniles involved in heinous crimes as adults.

A fresh Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill introduced in the Lok Sabha last year contained clauses that many child rights activists and groups disapproved of. A Standing Committee of Parliament recommended a review and reconsideration of all clauses that sought to carve out an exception for children in the 16-18 age group and subject them to the rigours of regular criminal procedure. However, the amended Bill now cleared by the Cabinet retains the clause that provides that when a heinous crime is committed by one in this age group, the Juvenile Justice Board will assess whether the crime has been committed as a ‘child’ or as an ‘adult’. The trial would take place on the basis of this assessment. The present framework classifies offences as petty, serious and heinous and treats each category under a different process. The government claims that since this assessment will be done with the help of psychologists and social experts, the rights of the juvenile would be protected. It remains to be seen if enough numbers of such professionals would be available across the country to make this work.

It should not be forgotten that making children face an adult criminal court would mar the prospect of their rehabilitation. The Supreme Court has not seen any special reason to amend the present juvenile law. Nor did the Justice J.S. Verma Committee, which made far- reaching recommendations on the legal framework for treating sexual offences, suggest such changes. The government should stick by the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which treats everyone up to 18 as a child. To the government's credit, it has held some consultations with stakeholders before finalising its latest draft. It has heeded the Parliamentary Committee’s objection to Clause 7, and dropped the arbitrary provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21 would be treated and tried as an adult. However, this is not enough. The government would do well to drop its attempt to have a differential system for those involved in ‘heinous offences’. Instead, it should pursue the other forward-looking aspects of the bill, which has welcome features for the care and protection of children that can help them significantly through provisions such as those for foster homes and a better-regulated adoption mechanism.


Refer the above for the Questions 1726 to 1725
1726. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “heinous”?




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Correct Ans:Atrocious
Explanation:
Workspace



It is unfortunate that the government seems determined to introduce legal provisions to ensure that children between the ages of 16 and 18 are tried as adults if they commit heinous offences such as murder and rape. Ever since a juvenile offender was given a ‘light’ sentence in the Delhi gang rape case of 2012 under the existing child-friendly laws, there has been a clamour to treat juveniles involved in heinous crimes as adults.

A fresh Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Bill introduced in the Lok Sabha last year contained clauses that many child rights activists and groups disapproved of. A Standing Committee of Parliament recommended a review and reconsideration of all clauses that sought to carve out an exception for children in the 16-18 age group and subject them to the rigours of regular criminal procedure. However, the amended Bill now cleared by the Cabinet retains the clause that provides that when a heinous crime is committed by one in this age group, the Juvenile Justice Board will assess whether the crime has been committed as a ‘child’ or as an ‘adult’. The trial would take place on the basis of this assessment. The present framework classifies offences as petty, serious and heinous and treats each category under a different process. The government claims that since this assessment will be done with the help of psychologists and social experts, the rights of the juvenile would be protected. It remains to be seen if enough numbers of such professionals would be available across the country to make this work.

It should not be forgotten that making children face an adult criminal court would mar the prospect of their rehabilitation. The Supreme Court has not seen any special reason to amend the present juvenile law. Nor did the Justice J.S. Verma Committee, which made far- reaching recommendations on the legal framework for treating sexual offences, suggest such changes. The government should stick by the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child, which treats everyone up to 18 as a child. To the government's credit, it has held some consultations with stakeholders before finalising its latest draft. It has heeded the Parliamentary Committee’s objection to Clause 7, and dropped the arbitrary provision that a person who had committed an offence when aged between 16 and 18 but was apprehended only after crossing the age of 21 would be treated and tried as an adult. However, this is not enough. The government would do well to drop its attempt to have a differential system for those involved in ‘heinous offences’. Instead, it should pursue the other forward-looking aspects of the bill, which has welcome features for the care and protection of children that can help them significantly through provisions such as those for foster homes and a better-regulated adoption mechanism.


Refer the above for the Questions 1727 to 1726
1727. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “clamour”?




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Correct Ans:Uproar
Explanation:
Workspace



Good manners are not inherited. And they don't come naturally to intelligent people. They have to be learnt and practised. They are based upon the concept of consideration for others. They are easy to acquire and there is nothing more profitable. Good manners are a necessary complements in every walk of life, especially in business. Organisations with competent and well-mannered representatives enjoy a good reputation. The morale, productivity and profits of such an organisation will be high. And this, in turn, will attract more business. There is no particular place or time when a person should show his elementary 9 courtesy. Courtesy, etiquette 10 and manners are tools that one should always carry with oneself, wherever one goes. The first step to success in life is treating others as courteously as we would wish others to treat us.


Refer the above for the Questions 1728 to 1727
1728. Which word in the passage means ‘rules of polite behaviour’?




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Correct Ans:Etiquette.
Explanation:
Workspace



Good manners are not inherited. And they don't come naturally to intelligent people. They have to be learnt and practised. They are based upon the concept of consideration for others. They are easy to acquire and there is nothing more profitable. Good manners are a necessary complements in every walk of life, especially in business. Organisations with competent and well-mannered representatives enjoy a good reputation. The morale, productivity and profits of such an organisation will be high. And this, in turn, will attract more business. There is no particular place or time when a person should show his elementary 9 courtesy. Courtesy, etiquette 10 and manners are tools that one should always carry with oneself, wherever one goes. The first step to success in life is treating others as courteously as we would wish others to treat us.


Refer the above for the Questions 1729 to 1728
1729. Courtesy has to be observed _________




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:everywhere and all the time.
Explanation:
Workspace



Good manners are not inherited. And they don't come naturally to intelligent people. They have to be learnt and practised. They are based upon the concept of consideration for others. They are easy to acquire and there is nothing more profitable. Good manners are a necessary complements in every walk of life, especially in business. Organisations with competent and well-mannered representatives enjoy a good reputation. The morale, productivity and profits of such an organisation will be high. And this, in turn, will attract more business. There is no particular place or time when a person should show his elementary 9 courtesy. Courtesy, etiquette 10 and manners are tools that one should always carry with oneself, wherever one goes. The first step to success in life is treating others as courteously as we would wish others to treat us.


Refer the above for the Questions 1730 to 1729
1730. Good manners are needed ________




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:In every walk of life.
Explanation:
Workspace



Good manners are not inherited. And they don't come naturally to intelligent people. They have to be learnt and practised. They are based upon the concept of consideration for others. They are easy to acquire and there is nothing more profitable. Good manners are a necessary complements in every walk of life, especially in business. Organisations with competent and well-mannered representatives enjoy a good reputation. The morale, productivity and profits of such an organisation will be high. And this, in turn, will attract more business. There is no particular place or time when a person should show his elementary 9 courtesy. Courtesy, etiquette 10 and manners are tools that one should always carry with oneself, wherever one goes. The first step to success in life is treating others as courteously as we would wish others to treat us.


Refer the above for the Questions 1731 to 1730
1731. How are good manners acquired ?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:They have to be learnt and practised.
Explanation:
Workspace



Good manners are not inherited. And they don't come naturally to intelligent people. They have to be learnt and practised. They are based upon the concept of consideration for others. They are easy to acquire and there is nothing more profitable. Good manners are a necessary complements in every walk of life, especially in business. Organisations with competent and well-mannered representatives enjoy a good reputation. The morale, productivity and profits of such an organisation will be high. And this, in turn, will attract more business. There is no particular place or time when a person should show his elementary 9 courtesy. Courtesy, etiquette 10 and manners are tools that one should always carry with oneself, wherever one goes. The first step to success in life is treating others as courteously as we would wish others to treat us.


Refer the above for the Questions 1732 to 1731
1732. What is meant by 'good manners’?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:It means consideration for others.
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1733 to 1732
1733. What is the antonym of the word “Dismay”?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Alarm
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1734 to 1733
1734. What does the author mean by the word “Invocation”?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Citation
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1735 to 1734
1735. Which of the following is the synonym of the word “Ventilate”, according to the passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Communicate
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1736 to 1735
1736. What is the synonym of the word “Impartially”?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Non-Partisan
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1737 to 1736
1737. The author is emphasizing on which of the following aspects?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:None of the above
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1738 to 1737
1738. Which of the following can not be inferred from the passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Speaker should be biased and should take care of the government
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1739 to 1738
1739. Which of the following is true according the passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Ms Mahajan was accused to be biased, as per many MP’s, on several instances
Explanation:
Workspace



Lok Sabha Speaker Sumitra Mahajan found herself in the eye of the storm last week after she delivered two almost identical rulings on consecutive days expunging jibes targeting Prime Minister Narendra Modi.

A heated debate followed, with an enraged Opposition unitedly questioning her on Thursday on whatever was “unparliamentary” in Aam Aadmi Party MP Bhagwant Mann’s remark that ending farmers’ suicides and the agrarian crisis would require more than a ‘Mann Ki Baat’, in a reference to Mr. Modi’s monthly radio broadcast. In the end, Ms. Mahajan was forced to retreat, saying she did not object to criticism of the Prime Minister — she just wished to emphasise that every issue should not be “politicised”. She agreed to examine the records, saying that if the context permitted such a comment, she would restore it. That has since been done, and Mr. Mann’s words are now part of the parliamentary record. Earlier she acknowledged that she had repeatedly told MPs it was wrong to refer to the Prime Minister in every discussion. On Wednesday, a remark by Congress MP K.C. Venugopal on Mr. Modi during a discussion on attacks on minorities had invited expunction by Ms. Mahajan.

In the 11 months since the Modi government came to power, the growing tension between Ms. Mahajan and the Opposition has been palpable, with many MPs expressing their dismay — if informally — at what they describe as the “partisan” attitude of the Chair. There have been occasions when Ms. Mahajan has directed the switching off of microphones mid-speech; her invocation of “Om Shanti” after obituary references has invited comment. But on Thursday it all exploded in the House in the full glare of the television cameras. In a parliamentary democracy the Speaker’s role is well-defined: once elected, she is expected to detach herself from government activity to run the House impartially. The Rules characterise the Speaker as “the true guardian of the traditions of parliamentary democracy”, stressing that her decisions are “final and binding and ordinarily cannot be questioned, challenged or criticised”. While giving “adequate opportunities to all sections of the House to ventilate their views”, she must “preserve the dignity of the House”. Mr. Modi is neither the first Prime Minister — nor will he be the last — to face Opposition fire in Parliament. Since Independence every Prime Minister has faced criticism. This was true also of Nehru, who enjoyed an absolute majority and enormous public esteem. Dr. Manmohan Singh, who was regularly pilloried in Parliament, would, like all his predecessors, defend himself. Mr. Modi, who has positioned himself as a strong leader, does not need the protection of the Chair. As for the Speaker, she must not just be just, she must be seen to do justice.


Refer the above for the Questions 1740 to 1739
1740. What does the author mean by the line “every issue should not be politicised”?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Every issue should not be used for political benefits
Explanation:
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