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Reading Comprehension Test Questions

Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below.

In the world of climate science and science in general data is king. The more of it you have, and the higher its quality, the better. And while such trends as the rise in temperatures and sea levels have impeccable data behind them, not every measure of a changing climate has been so lucky. Take the global wind and wave climate, for example, which measures trends in wind speed and wave height in oceans around the globe) Both of these factors affect the interplay between the atmosphere and ocean of both energy and carbon (more winds equal choppier waters, which can get in the way of air-to-water energy transfers), and of course higher waves could spell more trouble during storm surges and affect flooding levels. But it had been historically tricky to get reliable long-term data on these phenomena to study any possible trends.

Until now, that is. A paper in Science today uses satellite data to analyze wind speed and wave height over more than 30 years, and concluded that on average both are increasing, especially in the southern hemisphere, and especially during extreme conditions like storms. They also demonstrated a useful way to study these things in the first place, which should prove helpful to scientists moving forward. Why did it take till now to amass and analyze what should be a fairly straightforward dataset? As the paper’s authors explain, it wasn’t that easy. Ocean buoys, “the most obvious data source,” have proven problematic because changes over the years in their construction and instrumentation mean the data they’re spitting out isn’t really consistent in the long term. So it’d be comparing apples to, if not oranges, then at least other kinds of apples not ideal.

Thus, they turned to the satellite record, which currently runs from 1985 through 2018. Not bad, but the same worries came up there, too: With all the different kinds of hardware and software in space, maybe their data isn’t reliable enough for such research either? So, the authors decided to go in and find out. As you may have surmised by now, it worked out. In particular, they studied the data collected by three kinds of instruments on satellites: altimeters, which measure both wave height and wind speed; radiometers, which measure wind speed; and scatterometers, which measure wind speed and direction.

After cross-checking all the numbers, cross-validating with other satellites and just generally making sure they weren’t being fooled by anything, the authors concluded that these past 30-odd years had seen a strong positive trend in global wind speed, and a weaker (but still noticeable) increase in wave heights. They also noted the trends were much stronger in extreme cases, which they defined as the data from the set’s 90th percentile. Not that any of the actual changes were especially high. Wind speeds went up by about an inch per second every yearabout twice the speed of a garden snail across the Southern Ocean and south of the equator, where the trends were strongest. The change was about half that in the North Atlantic) (The extreme cases had the same distribution, but with faster speeds, around two inches per second per year.) Things weren’t quite as clear cut for wave height, but there were patches with overall rises of about a tenth of an inch per year, and one surprising spot in the North Pacific with a drop of about half an inch per year.

It might not sound like much, fractions of an inch here or there, but the results do show clear trends for global behaviour over time) Any improvement on our understanding of the global wind and wave climate is helpful, the authors write, since “estimates of future ocean wind and wave states, and whether extreme conditions are changing, are important elements of projections of total sea level.”The team also showed that the satellites can be trusted, since each of the different kinds of instruments, aboard 31 total orbiting satellites, ultimately showed data consistent with each other. This means future studies can ____ on this increasingly rich data set without having to worry about comparing apples to anything else. So not only did the authors add (A)/ some specific bits of that all-important data(B)/ to the global climate record, they also made(C)/ it easy for future researchers to do the same.(D)/

Refer the above for the Questions 121 to 120
121. According to paper in Science today wind speed and wave height on average both are increasing especially in?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Southern Hemisphere
Explanation:
Reference: A paper in Science today uses satellite data to analyze wind speed and wave height over more than 30 years, and concluded that on average both are increasing, especially in the southern hemisphere.
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Directions: Study the information and answer the following questions.

In a certain code language
'Security under Hack' is coded as 'Z4 V8 F5 ',
'Common incident Study' is coded as 'F5 R8 L6',
'Attention Perfect Game' is coded as 'Z9 V7 Z4'.

Refer the above for the Questions 122 to 121
122. Choose the word which is most nearly the OPPOSITE in meaning to the word "˜jibe"™ printed in bold as used in the passage.




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Differ
Explanation:
Option (e) is the correct answer choice for the given word.
Jibe- be in accord; agree.
All the given options are the synonyms of the given word ‘jibe’ except option (e), ‘differ’.
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Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA. The reason was the observation that Indians were almost all very well educated, lived in decent houses in upscale neighbourhoods, drove newer cars, had professional jobs and even their children did very well at school. I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.

This anxiety subsided over the years aided by the following realisations: a) Indians have always been gentle, peace-loving, law-abiding citizens/ immigrants, not involved in controversies; b) their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; c) Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”; d) many Americans developed appreciation for a variety of elements in Indian culture including yoga and meditation, spicy food, sitar music etc.; e) second generation Indians started to excel in a variety of areas, not the least of which is spelling bee contests and finally; f ) a climate of political correctness started to pervade society.

However, my fears resurfaced over the past ten years or so as I saw a massive influx of Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals into USA, mainly in the Silicon Valley area but also in many other major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Denver etc. This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants. Second, Americans think that they are somewhat rude in their behaviour because they did not have to learn accepted norms of interaction with others. They tend to socialise with each other and live in a world of Indian food, Bollywood movies, watching cricket on TV, daily communication with relatives in India through WhatsApp, etc. Unlike us, they earned good salaries from the time they set their feet here. They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a “fresh off the boat” image.

There is another aspect to the problem. A recent news report about Indian nationals crossing the US-Mexico border illegally has taken my anxiety levels to new heights. According to this report, it is not just people from central and south America and middle-easterners who are trying to enter the USA illegally from Mexico, but a rapidly increasing number of Indians has been added to the mix. There are Mexican groups called “the cayotes”, basically into human trafficking, who charge $25,000 per person to smuggle Indians in – a fee considerably higher than the more typical $8,000 or so for Mexicans and others. The news is shocking on several fronts. These episodes shatter the image of Indian immigrants as hardworking, law-abiding professionals. It has also been reported that some of these illegals are Sikhs. When questioned by immigration officers they say that they are seeking asylum in this country because of alleged political and religious persecution in India. The women, on the other hand, are claiming incidents of assault and abuse because of their lower castes and threats of honour killing.

I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India. I wonder if the illegal migration of Indians into this country marks the beginning of the end of dreams of many Indians living peaceful lives in USA. We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.

Refer the above for the Questions 123 to 122
123. Choose the word which is most nearly the SIMILAR in meaning to the word "Torturous" printed in bold as used in the passage.




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Agonizing
Explanation:
Option (a) is the correct answer choice for the given word.
Torturous- characterized by, involving, or causing pain or suffering.
Agonizing- causing great physical or mental pain.
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Directions: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

A “biological annihilation” of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history is under way and is more severe than previously feared, according to research. Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.
The study eschews the normally sober tone of scientific papers and calls the massive loss of wildlife a “biological annihilation” that represents a “frightening assault on the foundations of human civilisation”. Previous studies have shown species are becoming extinct at a significantly faster rate than for millions of years before, but even so extinctions remain relatively rare giving the impression of a gradual loss of biodiversity. The new work instead takes a broader view, assessing many common species which are losing populations all over the world as their ranges shrink, but remain present elsewhere.
The scientists found that a third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades. Detailed data is available for land mammals, and almost half of these have lost 80% of their range in the last century. The scientists found billions of populations of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians have been lost all over the planet, leading them to say a sixth mass extinction has already progressed further than was thought.
They say, while action to halt the decline remains possible, the prospects do not look good: “All signs point to ever more powerful assaults on biodiversity in the next two decades, painting a dismal picture of the future of life, including human life.” Wildlife is dying out due to habitat destruction, overhunting, toxic pollution, invasion by alien species and climate change. But the ultimate cause of all of these factors is “human overpopulation and continued population growth, and overconsumption, especially by the rich”, say the scientists, who include Prof Paul Ehrlich, at Stanford University in the US, whose 1968 book The Population Bomb is a seminal, if controversial, work. “The serious warning in our paper needs to be heeded because civilisation depends utterly on the plants, animals, and microorganisms of Earth that supply it with essential ecosystem services ranging from crop pollination and protection to supplying food from the sea and maintaining a livable climate,” Ehrlich told the Guardian. Other ecosystem services include clean air and water.
Citing human overpopulation as the root cause of environmental problems has long been controversial, and Ehrlich’s 1968 statement that hundreds of millions of people would die of starvation in the 1970s did not come to pass, partly due to new high-yielding crops that Ehrlich himself had noted as possible. Ehrlich has acknowledged “flaws” in The Population Bomb but said it had been successful in its central aim - alerting people to global environmental issues and the role of human population in them. His message remains blunt today: “Show me a scientist who claims there is no population problem and I’ll show you an idiot.”

Refer the above for the Questions 124 to 123
124. As per the information given in the passage, what is being considered as vulnerable to the existence of humans?
I. Excessive utilization
II. Dearth population
III. Moderate consumption
IV. Surplus population




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Both I and IV
Explanation:
By referring first paragraph, 'Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.'. So both excessive utilization and surplus population are considered as a threat to humans.
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Directions: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

A “biological annihilation” of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history is under way and is more severe than previously feared, according to research. Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.
The study eschews the normally sober tone of scientific papers and calls the massive loss of wildlife a “biological annihilation” that represents a “frightening assault on the foundations of human civilisation”. Previous studies have shown species are becoming extinct at a significantly faster rate than for millions of years before, but even so extinctions remain relatively rare giving the impression of a gradual loss of biodiversity. The new work instead takes a broader view, assessing many common species which are losing populations all over the world as their ranges shrink, but remain present elsewhere.
The scientists found that a third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades. Detailed data is available for land mammals, and almost half of these have lost 80% of their range in the last century. The scientists found billions of populations of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians have been lost all over the planet, leading them to say a sixth mass extinction has already progressed further than was thought.
They say, while action to halt the decline remains possible, the prospects do not look good: “All signs point to ever more powerful assaults on biodiversity in the next two decades, painting a dismal picture of the future of life, including human life.” Wildlife is dying out due to habitat destruction, overhunting, toxic pollution, invasion by alien species and climate change. But the ultimate cause of all of these factors is “human overpopulation and continued population growth, and overconsumption, especially by the rich”, say the scientists, who include Prof Paul Ehrlich, at Stanford University in the US, whose 1968 book The Population Bomb is a seminal, if controversial, work. “The serious warning in our paper needs to be heeded because civilisation depends utterly on the plants, animals, and microorganisms of Earth that supply it with essential ecosystem services ranging from crop pollination and protection to supplying food from the sea and maintaining a livable climate,” Ehrlich told the Guardian. Other ecosystem services include clean air and water.
Citing human overpopulation as the root cause of environmental problems has long been controversial, and Ehrlich’s 1968 statement that hundreds of millions of people would die of starvation in the 1970s did not come to pass, partly due to new high-yielding crops that Ehrlich himself had noted as possible. Ehrlich has acknowledged “flaws” in The Population Bomb but said it had been successful in its central aim - alerting people to global environmental issues and the role of human population in them. His message remains blunt today: “Show me a scientist who claims there is no population problem and I’ll show you an idiot.”

Refer the above for the Questions 125 to 124
125. Which ecosystem services are not listed in the passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Maintaining nitrogen levels in the soil.
Explanation:
Here, 'Maintaining nitrogen levels in the soil' is not discussed in the paragraph.
Workspace



Directions: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

A “biological annihilation” of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history is under way and is more severe than previously feared, according to research. Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.
The study eschews the normally sober tone of scientific papers and calls the massive loss of wildlife a “biological annihilation” that represents a “frightening assault on the foundations of human civilisation”. Previous studies have shown species are becoming extinct at a significantly faster rate than for millions of years before, but even so extinctions remain relatively rare giving the impression of a gradual loss of biodiversity. The new work instead takes a broader view, assessing many common species which are losing populations all over the world as their ranges shrink, but remain present elsewhere.
The scientists found that a third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades. Detailed data is available for land mammals, and almost half of these have lost 80% of their range in the last century. The scientists found billions of populations of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians have been lost all over the planet, leading them to say a sixth mass extinction has already progressed further than was thought.
They say, while action to halt the decline remains possible, the prospects do not look good: “All signs point to ever more powerful assaults on biodiversity in the next two decades, painting a dismal picture of the future of life, including human life.” Wildlife is dying out due to habitat destruction, overhunting, toxic pollution, invasion by alien species and climate change. But the ultimate cause of all of these factors is “human overpopulation and continued population growth, and overconsumption, especially by the rich”, say the scientists, who include Prof Paul Ehrlich, at Stanford University in the US, whose 1968 book The Population Bomb is a seminal, if controversial, work. “The serious warning in our paper needs to be heeded because civilisation depends utterly on the plants, animals, and microorganisms of Earth that supply it with essential ecosystem services ranging from crop pollination and protection to supplying food from the sea and maintaining a livable climate,” Ehrlich told the Guardian. Other ecosystem services include clean air and water.
Citing human overpopulation as the root cause of environmental problems has long been controversial, and Ehrlich’s 1968 statement that hundreds of millions of people would die of starvation in the 1970s did not come to pass, partly due to new high-yielding crops that Ehrlich himself had noted as possible. Ehrlich has acknowledged “flaws” in The Population Bomb but said it had been successful in its central aim - alerting people to global environmental issues and the role of human population in them. His message remains blunt today: “Show me a scientist who claims there is no population problem and I’ll show you an idiot.”

Refer the above for the Questions 126 to 125
126. What can be a suitable title for the given passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Earth staring at its sixth mass extinction event.
Explanation:
The suitable title for the given passage is 'Earth staring at its sixth mass extinction event'.
Workspace



Directions: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

A “biological annihilation” of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history is under way and is more severe than previously feared, according to research. Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.
The study eschews the normally sober tone of scientific papers and calls the massive loss of wildlife a “biological annihilation” that represents a “frightening assault on the foundations of human civilisation”. Previous studies have shown species are becoming extinct at a significantly faster rate than for millions of years before, but even so extinctions remain relatively rare giving the impression of a gradual loss of biodiversity. The new work instead takes a broader view, assessing many common species which are losing populations all over the world as their ranges shrink, but remain present elsewhere.
The scientists found that a third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades. Detailed data is available for land mammals, and almost half of these have lost 80% of their range in the last century. The scientists found billions of populations of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians have been lost all over the planet, leading them to say a sixth mass extinction has already progressed further than was thought.
They say, while action to halt the decline remains possible, the prospects do not look good: “All signs point to ever more powerful assaults on biodiversity in the next two decades, painting a dismal picture of the future of life, including human life.” Wildlife is dying out due to habitat destruction, overhunting, toxic pollution, invasion by alien species and climate change. But the ultimate cause of all of these factors is “human overpopulation and continued population growth, and overconsumption, especially by the rich”, say the scientists, who include Prof Paul Ehrlich, at Stanford University in the US, whose 1968 book The Population Bomb is a seminal, if controversial, work. “The serious warning in our paper needs to be heeded because civilisation depends utterly on the plants, animals, and microorganisms of Earth that supply it with essential ecosystem services ranging from crop pollination and protection to supplying food from the sea and maintaining a livable climate,” Ehrlich told the Guardian. Other ecosystem services include clean air and water.
Citing human overpopulation as the root cause of environmental problems has long been controversial, and Ehrlich’s 1968 statement that hundreds of millions of people would die of starvation in the 1970s did not come to pass, partly due to new high-yielding crops that Ehrlich himself had noted as possible. Ehrlich has acknowledged “flaws” in The Population Bomb but said it had been successful in its central aim - alerting people to global environmental issues and the role of human population in them. His message remains blunt today: “Show me a scientist who claims there is no population problem and I’ll show you an idiot.”

Refer the above for the Questions 127 to 126
127. Which of the following fact was found out by the scientists who conducted the study?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:A third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades.
Explanation:
By referring the third paragraph, 'A third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades'.
Workspace



Directions: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

A “biological annihilation” of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history is under way and is more severe than previously feared, according to research. Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.
The study eschews the normally sober tone of scientific papers and calls the massive loss of wildlife a “biological annihilation” that represents a “frightening assault on the foundations of human civilisation”. Previous studies have shown species are becoming extinct at a significantly faster rate than for millions of years before, but even so extinctions remain relatively rare giving the impression of a gradual loss of biodiversity. The new work instead takes a broader view, assessing many common species which are losing populations all over the world as their ranges shrink, but remain present elsewhere.
The scientists found that a third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades. Detailed data is available for land mammals, and almost half of these have lost 80% of their range in the last century. The scientists found billions of populations of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians have been lost all over the planet, leading them to say a sixth mass extinction has already progressed further than was thought.
They say, while action to halt the decline remains possible, the prospects do not look good: “All signs point to ever more powerful assaults on biodiversity in the next two decades, painting a dismal picture of the future of life, including human life.” Wildlife is dying out due to habitat destruction, overhunting, toxic pollution, invasion by alien species and climate change. But the ultimate cause of all of these factors is “human overpopulation and continued population growth, and overconsumption, especially by the rich”, say the scientists, who include Prof Paul Ehrlich, at Stanford University in the US, whose 1968 book The Population Bomb is a seminal, if controversial, work. “The serious warning in our paper needs to be heeded because civilisation depends utterly on the plants, animals, and microorganisms of Earth that supply it with essential ecosystem services ranging from crop pollination and protection to supplying food from the sea and maintaining a livable climate,” Ehrlich told the Guardian. Other ecosystem services include clean air and water.
Citing human overpopulation as the root cause of environmental problems has long been controversial, and Ehrlich’s 1968 statement that hundreds of millions of people would die of starvation in the 1970s did not come to pass, partly due to new high-yielding crops that Ehrlich himself had noted as possible. Ehrlich has acknowledged “flaws” in The Population Bomb but said it had been successful in its central aim - alerting people to global environmental issues and the role of human population in them. His message remains blunt today: “Show me a scientist who claims there is no population problem and I’ll show you an idiot.”

Refer the above for the Questions 128 to 127
128. Which of the following sentence can link the third and fourth paragraph of the passage?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Humanity will eventually pay a very high price for the decimation of the only assemblage of life that we know of in the universe.
Explanation:
By referring third and fourth paragraph, the sentence that logically and contextually link both the paragraph can be, 'Humanity will eventually pay a very high price for the decimation of the only assemblage of life that we know of in the universe'.
Workspace



Directions: Read the given passage carefully and answer the questions that follow.

A “biological annihilation” of wildlife in recent decades means a sixth mass extinction in Earth’s history is under way and is more severe than previously feared, according to research. Scientists analysed both common and rare species and found billions of regional or local populations have been lost. They blame human overpopulation and overconsumption for the crisis and warn that it threatens the survival of human civilisation, with just a short window of time in which to act.
The study eschews the normally sober tone of scientific papers and calls the massive loss of wildlife a “biological annihilation” that represents a “frightening assault on the foundations of human civilisation”. Previous studies have shown species are becoming extinct at a significantly faster rate than for millions of years before, but even so extinctions remain relatively rare giving the impression of a gradual loss of biodiversity. The new work instead takes a broader view, assessing many common species which are losing populations all over the world as their ranges shrink, but remain present elsewhere.
The scientists found that a third of the thousands of species losing populations are not currently considered endangered and that up to 50% of all individual animals have been lost in recent decades. Detailed data is available for land mammals, and almost half of these have lost 80% of their range in the last century. The scientists found billions of populations of mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians have been lost all over the planet, leading them to say a sixth mass extinction has already progressed further than was thought.
They say, while action to halt the decline remains possible, the prospects do not look good: “All signs point to ever more powerful assaults on biodiversity in the next two decades, painting a dismal picture of the future of life, including human life.” Wildlife is dying out due to habitat destruction, overhunting, toxic pollution, invasion by alien species and climate change. But the ultimate cause of all of these factors is “human overpopulation and continued population growth, and overconsumption, especially by the rich”, say the scientists, who include Prof Paul Ehrlich, at Stanford University in the US, whose 1968 book The Population Bomb is a seminal, if controversial, work. “The serious warning in our paper needs to be heeded because civilisation depends utterly on the plants, animals, and microorganisms of Earth that supply it with essential ecosystem services ranging from crop pollination and protection to supplying food from the sea and maintaining a livable climate,” Ehrlich told the Guardian. Other ecosystem services include clean air and water.
Citing human overpopulation as the root cause of environmental problems has long been controversial, and Ehrlich’s 1968 statement that hundreds of millions of people would die of starvation in the 1970s did not come to pass, partly due to new high-yielding crops that Ehrlich himself had noted as possible. Ehrlich has acknowledged “flaws” in The Population Bomb but said it had been successful in its central aim - alerting people to global environmental issues and the role of human population in them. His message remains blunt today: “Show me a scientist who claims there is no population problem and I’ll show you an idiot.”

Refer the above for the Questions 129 to 128
129. Which of the following statements do not echo the scientist Paul Ehrlich's views?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:New high - yielding crops were not possible to be developed.
Explanation:
By observing the last paragraph, we can find the statements of scientist Paul Ehrlich's views. Here, option E is incorrect.
Workspace



Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA. The reason was the observation that Indians were almost all very well educated, lived in decent houses in upscale neighbourhoods, drove newer cars, had professional jobs and even their children did very well at school. I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.

This anxiety subsided over the years aided by the following realisations: a) Indians have always been gentle, peace-loving, law-abiding citizens/ immigrants, not involved in controversies; b) their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; c) Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”; d) many Americans developed appreciation for a variety of elements in Indian culture including yoga and meditation, spicy food, sitar music etc.; e) second generation Indians started to excel in a variety of areas, not the least of which is spelling bee contests and finally; f ) a climate of political correctness started to pervade society.

However, my fears resurfaced over the past ten years or so as I saw a massive influx of Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals into USA, mainly in the Silicon Valley area but also in many other major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Denver etc. This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants. Second, Americans think that they are somewhat rude in their behaviour because they did not have to learn accepted norms of interaction with others. They tend to socialise with each other and live in a world of Indian food, Bollywood movies, watching cricket on TV, daily communication with relatives in India through WhatsApp, etc. Unlike us, they earned good salaries from the time they set their feet here. They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a “fresh off the boat” image.

There is another aspect to the problem. A recent news report about Indian nationals crossing the US-Mexico border illegally has taken my anxiety levels to new heights. According to this report, it is not just people from central and south America and middle-easterners who are trying to enter the USA illegally from Mexico, but a rapidly increasing number of Indians has been added to the mix. There are Mexican groups called “the cayotes”, basically into human trafficking, who charge $25,000 per person to smuggle Indians in – a fee considerably higher than the more typical $8,000 or so for Mexicans and others. The news is shocking on several fronts. These episodes shatter the image of Indian immigrants as hardworking, law-abiding professionals. It has also been reported that some of these illegals are Sikhs. When questioned by immigration officers they say that they are seeking asylum in this country because of alleged political and religious persecution in India. The women, on the other hand, are claiming incidents of assault and abuse because of their lower castes and threats of honour killing.

I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India. I wonder if the illegal migration of Indians into this country marks the beginning of the end of dreams of many Indians living peaceful lives in USA. We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.

Refer the above for the Questions 130 to 129
130. Choose the word which is most nearly the SIMILAR in meaning to the word "Oblivious" printed in bold as used in the passage.




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Unaware
Explanation:
Oblivious- not aware of or concerned about what is happening around one
Option (b) is the correct answer choice for the given word.
Placid- not easily upset or excited.
Workspace



Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA. The reason was the observation that Indians were almost all very well educated, lived in decent houses in upscale neighbourhoods, drove newer cars, had professional jobs and even their children did very well at school. I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.

This anxiety subsided over the years aided by the following realisations: a) Indians have always been gentle, peace-loving, law-abiding citizens/ immigrants, not involved in controversies; b) their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; c) Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”; d) many Americans developed appreciation for a variety of elements in Indian culture including yoga and meditation, spicy food, sitar music etc.; e) second generation Indians started to excel in a variety of areas, not the least of which is spelling bee contests and finally; f ) a climate of political correctness started to pervade society.

However, my fears resurfaced over the past ten years or so as I saw a massive influx of Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals into USA, mainly in the Silicon Valley area but also in many other major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Denver etc. This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants. Second, Americans think that they are somewhat rude in their behaviour because they did not have to learn accepted norms of interaction with others. They tend to socialise with each other and live in a world of Indian food, Bollywood movies, watching cricket on TV, daily communication with relatives in India through WhatsApp, etc. Unlike us, they earned good salaries from the time they set their feet here. They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a “fresh off the boat” image.

There is another aspect to the problem. A recent news report about Indian nationals crossing the US-Mexico border illegally has taken my anxiety levels to new heights. According to this report, it is not just people from central and south America and middle-easterners who are trying to enter the USA illegally from Mexico, but a rapidly increasing number of Indians has been added to the mix. There are Mexican groups called “the cayotes”, basically into human trafficking, who charge $25,000 per person to smuggle Indians in – a fee considerably higher than the more typical $8,000 or so for Mexicans and others. The news is shocking on several fronts. These episodes shatter the image of Indian immigrants as hardworking, law-abiding professionals. It has also been reported that some of these illegals are Sikhs. When questioned by immigration officers they say that they are seeking asylum in this country because of alleged political and religious persecution in India. The women, on the other hand, are claiming incidents of assault and abuse because of their lower castes and threats of honour killing.

I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India. I wonder if the illegal migration of Indians into this country marks the beginning of the end of dreams of many Indians living peaceful lives in USA. We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.

Refer the above for the Questions 131 to 130
131. Why the news of illegal migration of Indians into U.S. is shocking and perplexed for the author? 




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:All (a) (b) and (c)
Explanation:
All the options (a) (b) and (c) are correct. All the three options can be traced from the 5th paragraph where it is given that “. I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India.” Thus option (d) is the correct answer choice.
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Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA. The reason was the observation that Indians were almost all very well educated, lived in decent houses in upscale neighbourhoods, drove newer cars, had professional jobs and even their children did very well at school. I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.

This anxiety subsided over the years aided by the following realisations: a) Indians have always been gentle, peace-loving, law-abiding citizens/ immigrants, not involved in controversies; b) their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; c) Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”; d) many Americans developed appreciation for a variety of elements in Indian culture including yoga and meditation, spicy food, sitar music etc.; e) second generation Indians started to excel in a variety of areas, not the least of which is spelling bee contests and finally; f ) a climate of political correctness started to pervade society.

However, my fears resurfaced over the past ten years or so as I saw a massive influx of Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals into USA, mainly in the Silicon Valley area but also in many other major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Denver etc. This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants. Second, Americans think that they are somewhat rude in their behaviour because they did not have to learn accepted norms of interaction with others. They tend to socialise with each other and live in a world of Indian food, Bollywood movies, watching cricket on TV, daily communication with relatives in India through WhatsApp, etc. Unlike us, they earned good salaries from the time they set their feet here. They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a “fresh off the boat” image.

There is another aspect to the problem. A recent news report about Indian nationals crossing the US-Mexico border illegally has taken my anxiety levels to new heights. According to this report, it is not just people from central and south America and middle-easterners who are trying to enter the USA illegally from Mexico, but a rapidly increasing number of Indians has been added to the mix. There are Mexican groups called “the cayotes”, basically into human trafficking, who charge $25,000 per person to smuggle Indians in – a fee considerably higher than the more typical $8,000 or so for Mexicans and others. The news is shocking on several fronts. These episodes shatter the image of Indian immigrants as hardworking, law-abiding professionals. It has also been reported that some of these illegals are Sikhs. When questioned by immigration officers they say that they are seeking asylum in this country because of alleged political and religious persecution in India. The women, on the other hand, are claiming incidents of assault and abuse because of their lower castes and threats of honour killing.

I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India. I wonder if the illegal migration of Indians into this country marks the beginning of the end of dreams of many Indians living peaceful lives in USA. We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.

Refer the above for the Questions 132 to 131
132. “They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a fresh off the boat image.” In the given sentence what does the bold part implies?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Immigrants who arrive from a foreign nation and have yet to assimilate into the host nation's culture, but still continue with their ethnic ideas and practices
Explanation:
Fresh off the boat- The phrases fresh off the boat, off the boat, banana boat, or just simply boat are terms used to describe immigrants who have arrived from a foreign nation and have yet to assimilate into the host nation’s culture, language, and behaviour, but still continue with their ethnic ideas and practices.
When a person leaves his country to take up permanent residence in another country, he becomes an emigrant and an immigrant. He is an emigrant upon leaving his homeland and an immigrant upon arriving at his destination.
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Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA. The reason was the observation that Indians were almost all very well educated, lived in decent houses in upscale neighbourhoods, drove newer cars, had professional jobs and even their children did very well at school. I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.

This anxiety subsided over the years aided by the following realisations: a) Indians have always been gentle, peace-loving, law-abiding citizens/ immigrants, not involved in controversies; b) their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; c) Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”; d) many Americans developed appreciation for a variety of elements in Indian culture including yoga and meditation, spicy food, sitar music etc.; e) second generation Indians started to excel in a variety of areas, not the least of which is spelling bee contests and finally; f ) a climate of political correctness started to pervade society.

However, my fears resurfaced over the past ten years or so as I saw a massive influx of Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals into USA, mainly in the Silicon Valley area but also in many other major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Denver etc. This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants. Second, Americans think that they are somewhat rude in their behaviour because they did not have to learn accepted norms of interaction with others. They tend to socialise with each other and live in a world of Indian food, Bollywood movies, watching cricket on TV, daily communication with relatives in India through WhatsApp, etc. Unlike us, they earned good salaries from the time they set their feet here. They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a “fresh off the boat” image.

There is another aspect to the problem. A recent news report about Indian nationals crossing the US-Mexico border illegally has taken my anxiety levels to new heights. According to this report, it is not just people from central and south America and middle-easterners who are trying to enter the USA illegally from Mexico, but a rapidly increasing number of Indians has been added to the mix. There are Mexican groups called “the cayotes”, basically into human trafficking, who charge $25,000 per person to smuggle Indians in – a fee considerably higher than the more typical $8,000 or so for Mexicans and others. The news is shocking on several fronts. These episodes shatter the image of Indian immigrants as hardworking, law-abiding professionals. It has also been reported that some of these illegals are Sikhs. When questioned by immigration officers they say that they are seeking asylum in this country because of alleged political and religious persecution in India. The women, on the other hand, are claiming incidents of assault and abuse because of their lower castes and threats of honour killing.

I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India. I wonder if the illegal migration of Indians into this country marks the beginning of the end of dreams of many Indians living peaceful lives in USA. We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.

Refer the above for the Questions 133 to 132
133. According to the author how people fleeing from India to U.S. now-a-days are different from the people who flew many years ago?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Both (a) and (b)
Explanation:
Both the options (a) and (b) are correct. The option (a) can be traced from the 3rd paragraph where it is given that “This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming the US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become the US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants.” Thus, the option (c) is the correct answer choice.
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Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA. The reason was the observation that Indians were almost all very well educated, lived in decent houses in upscale neighbourhoods, drove newer cars, had professional jobs and even their children did very well at school. I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.

This anxiety subsided over the years aided by the following realisations: a) Indians have always been gentle, peace-loving, law-abiding citizens/ immigrants, not involved in controversies; b) their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; c) Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”; d) many Americans developed appreciation for a variety of elements in Indian culture including yoga and meditation, spicy food, sitar music etc.; e) second generation Indians started to excel in a variety of areas, not the least of which is spelling bee contests and finally; f ) a climate of political correctness started to pervade society.

However, my fears resurfaced over the past ten years or so as I saw a massive influx of Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals into USA, mainly in the Silicon Valley area but also in many other major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Denver etc. This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants. Second, Americans think that they are somewhat rude in their behaviour because they did not have to learn accepted norms of interaction with others. They tend to socialise with each other and live in a world of Indian food, Bollywood movies, watching cricket on TV, daily communication with relatives in India through WhatsApp, etc. Unlike us, they earned good salaries from the time they set their feet here. They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a “fresh off the boat” image.

There is another aspect to the problem. A recent news report about Indian nationals crossing the US-Mexico border illegally has taken my anxiety levels to new heights. According to this report, it is not just people from central and south America and middle-easterners who are trying to enter the USA illegally from Mexico, but a rapidly increasing number of Indians has been added to the mix. There are Mexican groups called “the cayotes”, basically into human trafficking, who charge $25,000 per person to smuggle Indians in – a fee considerably higher than the more typical $8,000 or so for Mexicans and others. The news is shocking on several fronts. These episodes shatter the image of Indian immigrants as hardworking, law-abiding professionals. It has also been reported that some of these illegals are Sikhs. When questioned by immigration officers they say that they are seeking asylum in this country because of alleged political and religious persecution in India. The women, on the other hand, are claiming incidents of assault and abuse because of their lower castes and threats of honour killing.

I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India. I wonder if the illegal migration of Indians into this country marks the beginning of the end of dreams of many Indians living peaceful lives in USA. We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.

Refer the above for the Questions 134 to 133
134. How Indian people living in U.S. are taking an edge over ‘the living’ of many other Asian people? 




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:All (a) (b) and (c)
Explanation:
All the three options are correct .Option (a) (b) and (c) can be traced from the 2nd paragraph where it is given “their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”. Thus option (d) is the correct answer choice.
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Directions: Read the following passage carefully and answer the question given below it. Certain parts are given in bold to answer some of the questions based on the passage.

Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA. The reason was the observation that Indians were almost all very well educated, lived in decent houses in upscale neighbourhoods, drove newer cars, had professional jobs and even their children did very well at school. I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.

This anxiety subsided over the years aided by the following realisations: a) Indians have always been gentle, peace-loving, law-abiding citizens/ immigrants, not involved in controversies; b) their fluency in English exceeds that of immigrants like the Chinese, Mexicans and even eastern Europeans; c) Indians are open to inter-racial marriages indicating a desire to get assimilated with society, as opposed to living in isolated ethnic pockets like “little Tokyo”; d) many Americans developed appreciation for a variety of elements in Indian culture including yoga and meditation, spicy food, sitar music etc.; e) second generation Indians started to excel in a variety of areas, not the least of which is spelling bee contests and finally; f ) a climate of political correctness started to pervade society.

However, my fears resurfaced over the past ten years or so as I saw a massive influx of Indian Information Technology (IT) professionals into USA, mainly in the Silicon Valley area but also in many other major cities including Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Denver etc. This new generation of Indians is distinctly different from immigrants like us who came here for higher education and then struggled for many years to establish a good life, eventually becoming US citizens. First, most Indians in the IT field are not US citizens and came here on H1B visas for periods of between three and six years. They either do not want to or cannot become US citizens. So, they are oblivious to social and political issues in this country. They know that they can go back to India at any time if the situation warrants. Second, Americans think that they are somewhat rude in their behaviour because they did not have to learn accepted norms of interaction with others. They tend to socialise with each other and live in a world of Indian food, Bollywood movies, watching cricket on TV, daily communication with relatives in India through WhatsApp, etc. Unlike us, they earned good salaries from the time they set their feet here. They live a good life, but their attire and mannerisms spell a “fresh off the boat” image.

There is another aspect to the problem. A recent news report about Indian nationals crossing the US-Mexico border illegally has taken my anxiety levels to new heights. According to this report, it is not just people from central and south America and middle-easterners who are trying to enter the USA illegally from Mexico, but a rapidly increasing number of Indians has been added to the mix. There are Mexican groups called “the cayotes”, basically into human trafficking, who charge $25,000 per person to smuggle Indians in – a fee considerably higher than the more typical $8,000 or so for Mexicans and others. The news is shocking on several fronts. These episodes shatter the image of Indian immigrants as hardworking, law-abiding professionals. It has also been reported that some of these illegals are Sikhs. When questioned by immigration officers they say that they are seeking asylum in this country because of alleged political and religious persecution in India. The women, on the other hand, are claiming incidents of assault and abuse because of their lower castes and threats of honour killing.

I am puzzled by these claims. While such abuses certainly exist in India they cannot possibly be so widespread or severe as to cause thousands of people to flee India and take this long torturous route to the USA. Ability to pay $25000 also casts some doubt about their claims. It is sad because such claims only reinforce racial stereotyping that exists in this country about Indians. The news is also appalling in the sense that people who are presumably intelligent and educated are willing to spend $25K per person to engage in such a risky and illegal effort. On their long journey through South and Central America there is considerable danger of getting robbed, falling sick and even getting caught in the middle of a violence related to drug trafficking. The story also does not jibe with the continuing economic prosperity and modernisation in India. I wonder if the illegal migration of Indians into this country marks the beginning of the end of dreams of many Indians living peaceful lives in USA. We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.

Refer the above for the Questions 135 to 134
135. According to the passage what are the point(s) that the author has anxiety for? 




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:All (a) (b) and (c)
Explanation:
All the given three options are correct .Option (a) and (b) can be traced from the 1st paragraph where it is given that “Ever since I came to the USA in the early 1970s I had been anxious that one day there would be a backlash against the Indian immigrant community in the USA, ……….I was worried that some lunatic American would declare one day that these Indians must be doing something unethical, if not illegal that enabled them to live such a good life.” Option (c) can be traced from the last paragraph where it is given “We might be viewed in future in the same way as Mexicans or Middle-easterners are; undesirable people who want to come here at any cost and then become a burden on society. I hope that I am wrong.” Thus option (e) is the correct answer choice.
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Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

A library is an organized collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing. It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both. A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, e-books and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items. A library is organized for use and is maintained by a public body, an institution, a corporation, or a private individual. Public and institutional collections and services may be intended for use by people who choose not to or cannot afford to purchase an extensive collection themselves, who need material no individual can reasonably be expected to have, or who require professional assistance with their research. In addition to providing materials, libraries also provide the services of librarians who are experts at finding and organizing information and at interpreting information needs. Libraries often provide quiet areas for studying, and they also offer common areas to facilitate group study and collaboration. Libraries are extending services beyond the physical walls of a building by providing material accessible by electronic means.

Refer the above for the Questions 136 to 135
136. In terms of ownership who can afford a library?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Anyone
Explanation:
According to the passage a library can be owned by anyone.
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Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

A library is an organized collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing. It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both. A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, e-books and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items. A library is organized for use and is maintained by a public body, an institution, a corporation, or a private individual. Public and institutional collections and services may be intended for use by people who choose not to or cannot afford to purchase an extensive collection themselves, who need material no individual can reasonably be expected to have, or who require professional assistance with their research. In addition to providing materials, libraries also provide the services of librarians who are experts at finding and organizing information and at interpreting information needs. Libraries often provide quiet areas for studying, and they also offer common areas to facilitate group study and collaboration. Libraries are extending services beyond the physical walls of a building by providing material accessible by electronic means.

Refer the above for the Questions 137 to 136
137. In the passage, a library has been defined as




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:A place where accessibility is possible
Explanation:
In the passage, a library has been defined as a place where accessibility is possible.
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Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

A library is an organized collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing. It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both. A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, e-books and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items. A library is organized for use and is maintained by a public body, an institution, a corporation, or a private individual. Public and institutional collections and services may be intended for use by people who choose not to or cannot afford to purchase an extensive collection themselves, who need material no individual can reasonably be expected to have, or who require professional assistance with their research. In addition to providing materials, libraries also provide the services of librarians who are experts at finding and organizing information and at interpreting information needs. Libraries often provide quiet areas for studying, and they also offer common areas to facilitate group study and collaboration. Libraries are extending services beyond the physical walls of a building by providing material accessible by electronic means.

Refer the above for the Questions 138 to 137
138. Who maintains a library?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:A public body, an institution, a corporation or an individual
Explanation:
Library is maintained by the public body, an institution, a corporation or an individual.
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Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

A library is an organized collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing. It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both. A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, e-books and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items. A library is organized for use and is maintained by a public body, an institution, a corporation, or a private individual. Public and institutional collections and services may be intended for use by people who choose not to or cannot afford to purchase an extensive collection themselves, who need material no individual can reasonably be expected to have, or who require professional assistance with their research. In addition to providing materials, libraries also provide the services of librarians who are experts at finding and organizing information and at interpreting information needs. Libraries often provide quiet areas for studying, and they also offer common areas to facilitate group study and collaboration. Libraries are extending services beyond the physical walls of a building by providing material accessible by electronic means.

Refer the above for the Questions 139 to 138
139. What can a library"™s collection include?




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:Books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, e-books and other formats
Explanation:
Refer to, “A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, e-books and other formats.”
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Directions: A passage is given with 5 questions following it. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

A library is an organized collection of sources of information and similar resources, made accessible to a defined community for reference or borrowing. It provides physical or digital access to material, and may be a physical building or room, or a virtual space, or both. A library’s collection can include books, periodicals, newspapers, manuscripts, films, maps, e-books and other formats. Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items. A library is organized for use and is maintained by a public body, an institution, a corporation, or a private individual. Public and institutional collections and services may be intended for use by people who choose not to or cannot afford to purchase an extensive collection themselves, who need material no individual can reasonably be expected to have, or who require professional assistance with their research. In addition to providing materials, libraries also provide the services of librarians who are experts at finding and organizing information and at interpreting information needs. Libraries often provide quiet areas for studying, and they also offer common areas to facilitate group study and collaboration. Libraries are extending services beyond the physical walls of a building by providing material accessible by electronic means.

Refer the above for the Questions 140 to 139
140. Libraries range in size from




SHOW ANSWER
Correct Ans:A few shelves of books to several million items
Explanation:
Refer to, “Libraries range in size from a few shelves of books to several million items.”
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