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Java Questions And Answers Sample Test 8


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Java Test 8


You have scored 3 out of 10
You Scored:2
Total Questions:2
Attended Questions:2
Correct Answered:2
1. Which collection class allows you to access its elements by associating a key with an element's value, and provides synchronization?



Explanation:

Hashtable is the only class listed that provides synchronized methods. If you need synchronization great; otherwise, use HashMap, it's faster.


2.
What will be the output of the program?

class PassA 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        PassA p = new PassA();
        p.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        long [] a1 = {3,4,5};
        long [] a2 = fix(a1);
        System.out.print(a1[0] + a1[1] + a1[2] + " ");
        System.out.println(a2[0] + a2[1] + a2[2]);
    }

    long [] fix(long [] a3) 
    {
        a3[1] = 7;
        return a3;
    }
}



Explanation:

Output: 15 15

The reference variables a1 and a3 refer to the same long array object. When the [1] element is updated in the fix() method, it is updating the array referred to by a1. The reference variable a2 refers to the same array object.

So Output: 3+7+5+" "3+7+5

Output: 15 15 Because Numeric values will be added


3.
What will be the output of the program?

public class Test 
    public static void leftshift(int i, int j) 
    {
        i <<= j; 
    } 
    public static void main(String args[]) 
    {
        int i = 4, j = 2; 
        leftshift(i, j); 
        System.out.printIn(i); 
    } 
}



Explanation:

Java only ever passes arguments to a method by value (i.e. a copy of the variable) and never by reference. Therefore the value of the variable i remains unchanged in the main method.

If you are clever you will spot that 16 is 4 multiplied by 2 twice, (4 * 2 * 2) = 16. If you had 16 left shifted by three bits then 16 * 2 * 2 * 2 = 128. If you had 128 right shifted by 2 bits then 128 / 2 / 2 = 32. Keeping these points in mind, you don't have to go converting to binary to do the left and right bit shifts.


4.
public void test(int x) 
    int odd = 1; 
    if(odd) /* Line 4 */
    {
        System.out.println("odd"); 
    } 
    else 
    {
        System.out.println("even"); 
    } 
}
Which statement is true?



Explanation:

The compiler will complain because of incompatible types (line 4), the if expects a boolean but it gets an integer.


5.
public void foo( boolean a, boolean b)
    if( a ) 
    {
        System.out.println("A"); /* Line 5 */
    } 
    else if(a && b) /* Line 7 */
    { 
        System.out.println( "A && B"); 
    } 
    else /* Line 11 */
    { 
        if ( !b ) 
        {
            System.out.println( "notB") ;
        } 
        else 
        {
            System.out.println( "ELSE" ) ; 
        } 
    } 
}



Explanation:

Option C is correct. The output is "ELSE". Only when a is false do the output lines after 11 get some chance of executing.

Option A is wrong. The output is "A". When a is true, irrespective of the value of b, only the line 5 output will be executed. The condition at line 7 will never be evaluated (when a is true it will always be trapped by the line 12 condition) therefore the output will never be "A && B".

Option B is wrong. The output is "A". When a is true, irrespective of the value of b, only the line 5 output will be executed.

Option D is wrong. The output is "notB".


6. Which interface does java.util.Hashtable implement?



Explanation:

Hash table based implementation of the Map interface.


7. You need to store elements in a collection that guarantees that no duplicates are stored and all elements can be accessed in natural order. Which interface provides that capability?



Explanation:

Option B is correct. A set is a collection that contains no duplicate elements. The iterator returns the elements in no particular order (unless this set is an instance of some class that provides a guarantee). A map cannot contain duplicate keys but it may contain duplicate values. List and Collection allow duplicate elements.

Option A is wrong. A map is an object that maps keys to values. A map cannot contain duplicate keys; each key can map to at most one value. The Map interface provides three collection views, which allow a map's contents to be viewed as a set of keys, collection of values, or set of key-value mappings. The order of a map is defined as the order in which the iterators on the map's collection views return their elements. Some map implementations, like the TreeMap class, make specific guarantees as to their order (ascending key order); others, like the HashMap class, do not (does not guarantee that the order will remain constant over time).

Option C is wrong. A list is an ordered collection (also known as a sequence). The user of this interface has precise control over where in the list each element is inserted. The user can access elements by their integer index (position in the list), and search for elements in the list. Unlike sets, lists typically allow duplicate elements.

Option D is wrong. A collection is also known as a sequence. The user of this interface has precise control over where in the list each element is inserted. The user can access elements by their integer index (position in the list), and search for elements in the list. Unlike sets, lists typically allow duplicate elements.


8.
class Boo 
{
    Boo(String s) { }
    Boo() { }
}
class Bar extends Boo 
{
    Bar() { }
    Bar(String s) {super(s);}
    void zoo() 
    {
    // insert code here
    }
}
which one create an anonymous inner class from within class Bar?



Explanation:

Option B is correct because anonymous inner classes are no different from any other class when it comes to polymorphism. That means you are always allowed to declare a reference variable of the superclass type and have that reference variable refer to an instance of a subclass type, which in this case is an anonymous subclass of Bar. Since Bar is a subclass of Boo, it all works.

Option A is incorrect because it passes an int to the Boo constructor, and there is no matching constructor in the Boo class.

Option C is incorrect because it violates the rules of polymorphism—you cannot refer to a superclass type using a reference variable declared as the subclass type. The superclass is not guaranteed to have everything the subclass has.

Option D uses incorrect syntax.


9.
What will be the output of the program?

public class X 
{  
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        try 
        {
            badMethod();  
            System.out.print("A"); 
        }  
        catch (Exception ex) 
        {
            System.out.print("B");  
        } 
        finally 
        {
            System.out.print("C"); 
        } 
        System.out.print("D"); 
    }  
    public static void badMethod() 
    {
        throw new Error(); /* Line 22 */
    } 
}



Explanation:

Error is thrown but not recognised line(22) because the only catch attempts to catch an Exception and Exception is not a superclass of Error. Therefore only the code in the finally statement can be run before exiting with a runtime error (Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error).


10.
public class X 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        X x = new X();
        X x2 = m1(x); /* Line 6 */
        X x4 = new X();
        x2 = x4; /* Line 8 */
        doComplexStuff();
    }
    static X m1(X mx) 
    {
        mx = new X();
        return mx;
    }
}
After line 8 runs. how many objects are eligible for garbage collection?



Explanation:

By the time line 8 has run, the only object without a reference is the one generated as a result of line 6. Remember that "Java is pass by value," so the reference variable x is not affected by the m1() method.


11.
public class ExceptionTest 
    class TestException extends Exception {} 
    public void runTest() throws TestException {} 
    public void test() /* Point X */ 
    { 
        runTest(); 
    } 
}
At Point X on line 5, which code is necessary to make the code compile?



Explanation:

Option B is correct. This works because it DOES throw an exception if an error occurs.

Option A is wrong. If you compile the code as given the compiler will complain:

"unreported exception must be caught or declared to be thrown" The class extends Exception so we are forced to test for exceptions.

Option C is wrong. The catch statement belongs in a method body not a method specification.

Option D is wrong. TestException is a subclass of Exception therefore the test method, in this example, must throw TestException or some other class further up the Exception tree. Throwing RuntimeException is just not on as this belongs in the java.lang.RuntimeException branch (it is not a superclass of TestException). The compiler complains with the same error as in A above.


12.
What will be the output of the program?

public class If2 
{
    static boolean b1, b2;
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x = 0;
        if ( !b1 ) /* Line 7 */
        {
            if ( !b2 ) /* Line 9 */
            {
                b1 = true;
                x++;
                if ( 5 > 6 ) 
                {
                    x++;
                }
                if ( !b1 ) 
                    x = x + 10;
                else if ( b2 = true ) /* Line 19 */
                    x = x + 100;
                else if ( b1 | b2 ) /* Line 21 */
                    x = x + 1000;
            }
        }
        System.out.println(x);
    }
}



Explanation:

As instance variables, b1 and b2 are initialized to false. The if tests on lines 7 and 9 are successful so b1 is set to true and x is incremented. The next if test to succeed is on line 19 (note that the code is not testing to see if b2 is true, it is setting b2 to be true). Since line 19 was successful, subsequent else-if's (line 21) will be skipped.


13. Which interface provides the capability to store objects using a key-value pair?



Explanation:

An object that maps keys to values. A map cannot contain duplicate keys; each key can map to at most one value.


14.
Which two are valid constructors for Thread?

Thread(Runnable r, String name)
Thread()
Thread(int priority)
Thread(Runnable r, ThreadGroup g)
Thread(Runnable r, int priority)



Explanation:

(1) and (2) are both valid constructors for Thread.

(3), (4), and (5) are not legal Thread constructors, although (4) is close. If you reverse the arguments in (4), you'd have a valid constructor.


15.
class X2 
{
    public X2 x;
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        X2 x2 = new X2();  /* Line 6 */
        X2 x3 = new X2();  /* Line 7 */
        x2.x = x3;
        x3.x = x2;
        x2 = new X2();
        x3 = x2; /* Line 11 */
        doComplexStuff();
    }
}
after line 11 runs, how many objects are eligible for garbage collection?



Explanation:

This is an example of the islands of isolated objects. By the time line 11 has run, the objects instantiated in lines 6 and 7 are referring to each other, but no live thread can reach either of them.


16.
Which three statements are true?

Assertion checking is typically enabled when a program is deployed.
It is never appropriate to write code to handle failure of an assert statement.
Assertion checking is typically enabled during program development and testing.
Assertion checking can be selectively enabled or disabled on a per-package basis, but not on a per-class basis.
Assertion checking can be selectively enabled or disabled on both a per-package basis and a per-class basis.



Explanation:

(1) is wrong. It's just not true.

(2) is correct. You're never supposed to handle an assertion failure.

(3) is correct. Assertions let you test your assumptions during development, but the assertion code—in effect—evaporates when the program is deployed, leaving behind no overhead or debugging code to track down and remove.

(4) is wrong. See the explanation for (5) below.

(5) is correct. Assertion checking can be selectively enabled or disabled on a per-package basis. Note that the package default assertion status determines the assertion status for classes initialized in the future that belong to the named package or any of its "subpackages".

The assertion status can be set for a named top-level class and any nested classes contained therein. This setting takes precedence over the class loader's default assertion status, and over any applicable per-package default. If the named class is not a top-level class, the change of status will have no effect on the actual assertion status of any class


17.
What will be the output of the program?

class Test 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        Test p = new Test();
        p.start();
    }

    void start() 
    {
        boolean b1 = false;
        boolean b2 = fix(b1);
        System.out.println(b1 + " " + b2);
    }

    boolean fix(boolean b1) 
    {
        b1 = true;
        return b1;
    }
}



Explanation:

The boolean b1 in the fix() method is a different boolean than the b1 in the start() method. The b1 in the start() method is not updated by the fix() method.


18.
What will be the output of the program?

class Bitwise 
{
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int x = 11 & 9;
        int y = x ^ 3;
        System.out.println( y | 12 );
    }
}



Explanation:

The & operator produces a 1 bit when both bits are 1. The result of the & operation is 9. The ^ operator produces a 1 bit when exactly one bit is 1; the result of this operation is 10. The | operator produces a 1 bit when at least one bit is 1; the result of this operation is 14.


19.
public class Test2 
{
    public static int x;
    public static int foo(int y) 
    {
        return y * 2;
    }
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int z = 5;
        assert z > 0; /* Line 11 */
        assert z > 2: foo(z); /* Line 12 */
        if ( z < 7 )
            assert z > 4; /* Line 14 */

        switch (z) 
        {
            case 4: System.out.println("4 ");
            case 5: System.out.println("5 ");
            default: assert z < 10;
        }

        if ( z < 10 )
            assert z > 4: z++; /* Line 22 */
        System.out.println(z);
    }
}
which line is an example of an inappropriate use of assertions?



Explanation:

Assert statements should not cause side effects. Line 22 changes the value of z if the assert statement is false.

Option A is fine; a second expression in an assert statement is not required.

Option B is fine because it is perfectly acceptable to call a method with the second expression of an assert statement.

Option C is fine because it is proper to call an assert statement conditionally.

View Answer Workspace Report Discuss in Forum



Read more:
Assertions - Pointing out the correct statements
Assertions - Pointing out the errors



20. Which of the following statements is true?



Explanation:

Option A is correct because it is sometimes advisable to thrown an assertion error even if assertions have been disabled.

Option B is incorrect because it is considered appropriate to check argument values in private methods using assertions.

Option C is incorrect; finally is never bypassed.

Option D is incorrect because AssertionErrors should never be handled.


21.
What will be the output of the program (when you run with the -ea option) ?

public class Test 
{  
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        int x = 0;  
        assert (x > 0) : "assertion failed"; /* Line 6 */
        System.out.println("finished"); 
    } 
}



Explanation:

An assertion Error is thrown as normal giving the output "assertion failed". The word "finished" is not printed (ensure you run with the -ea option)

Assertion failures are generally labeled in the stack trace with the file and line number from which they were thrown, and also in this case with the error's detail message "assertion failed". The detail message is supplied by the assert statement in line 6.


22.
Which four options describe the correct default values for array elements of the types indicated?

int -> 0
String -> "null"
Dog -> null
char -> 'u0000'
float -> 0.0f
boolean -> true



Explanation:

(1), (3), (4), (5) are the correct statements.

(2) is wrong because the default value for a String (and any other object reference) is null, with no quotes.

(6) is wrong because the default value for boolean elements is false.


23.
public Object m() 
{  
    Object o = new Float(3.14F); 
    Object [] oa = new Object[l];
    oa[0] = o; /* Line 5 */
    o = null;  /* Line 6 */
    oa[0] = null; /* Line 7 */
    return o; /* Line 8 */
}
When is the Float object, created in line 3, eligible for garbage collection?



Explanation:

Option A is wrong. This simply copies the object reference into the array.

Option B is wrong. The reference o is set to null, but, oa[0] still maintains the reference to the Float object.

Option C is correct. The thread of execution will then not have access to the object.


24.
public class Test2 
{
    public static int x;
    public static int foo(int y) 
    {
        return y * 2;
    }
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        int z = 5;
        assert z > 0; /* Line 11 */
        assert z > 2: foo(z); /* Line 12 */
        if ( z < 7 )
            assert z > 4; /* Line 14 */

        switch (z) 
        {
            case 4: System.out.println("4 ");
            case 5: System.out.println("5 ");
            default: assert z < 10;
        }

        if ( z < 10 )
            assert z > 4: z++; /* Line 22 */
        System.out.println(z);
    }
}
which line is an example of an inappropriate use of assertions?



Explanation:

Assert statements should not cause side effects. Line 22 changes the value of z if the assert statement is false.

Option A is fine; a second expression in an assert statement is not required.

Option B is fine because it is perfectly acceptable to call a method with the second expression of an assert statement.

Option C is fine because it is proper to call an assert statement conditionally.


25.
What will be the output of the program?

public class X 
{  
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        try 
        {
            badMethod(); /* Line 7 */
            System.out.print("A"); 
        } 
        catch (Exception ex) /* Line 10 */
        {
            System.out.print("B"); /* Line 12 */
        } 
        finally /* Line 14 */
        {
            System.out.print("C"); /* Line 16 */
        }  
        System.out.print("D"); /* Line 18 */
    } 
    public static void badMethod() 
    {
        throw new RuntimeException(); 
    } 
}



Explanation:

(1) A RuntimeException is thrown, this is a subclass of exception.

(2) The exception causes the try to complete abruptly (line 7) therefore line 8 is never executed.

(3) The exception is caught (line 10) and "B" is output (line 12)

(4) The finally block (line 14) is always executed and "C" is output (line 16).

(5) The exception was caught, so the program continues with line 18 and outputs "D".


26.
Which two of the following methods are defined in class Thread?

start()
wait()
notify()
run()
terminate()



Explanation:

(1) and (4). Only start() and run() are defined by the Thread class.

(2) and (3) are incorrect because they are methods of the Object class. (5) is incorrect because there's no such method in any thread-related class.


27.
What will be the output of the program?

public class RTExcept 
{
    public static void throwit () 
    {
        System.out.print("throwit ");
        throw new RuntimeException();
    }
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        try 
        {
            System.out.print("hello ");
            throwit();
        }
        catch (Exception re ) 
        {
            System.out.print("caught ");
        }
        finally 
        {
            System.out.print("finally ");
        }
        System.out.println("after ");
    }
}



Explanation:

The main() method properly catches and handles the RuntimeException in the catch block, finally runs (as it always does), and then the code returns to normal.

A, B and C are incorrect based on the program logic described above. Remember that properly handled exceptions do not cause the program to stop executing.


28.
What will be the output of the program?

public class X 
    public static void main(String [] args) 
    {
        try 
        {
            badMethod();  
            System.out.print("A"); 
        }  
        catch (Exception ex) 
        {
            System.out.print("B"); 
        }  
        finally 
        {
            System.out.print("C"); 
        }  
        System.out.print("D"); 
    }  
    public static void badMethod() {} 



Explanation:

There is no exception thrown, so all the code with the exception of the catch statement block is run.


29.
public class While 
{
    public void loop() 
    {
        int x= 0;
        while ( 1 ) /* Line 6 */
        {
            System.out.print("x plus one is " + (x + 1)); /* Line 8 */
        }
    }
}
Which statement is true?



Explanation:

Using the integer 1 in the while statement, or any other looping or conditional construct for that matter, will result in a compiler error. This is old C Program syntax, not valid Java.

A, B and C are incorrect because line 1 is valid (Java is case sensitive so While is a valid class name). Line 8 is also valid because an equation may be placed in a String operation as shown.


30. Which will contain the body of the thread?



Explanation:

Option A is Correct. The run() method to a thread is like the main() method to an application. Starting the thread causes the object's run method to be called in that separately executing thread.

Option B is wrong. The start() method causes this thread to begin execution; the Java Virtual Machine calls the run method of this thread.

Option C is wrong. The stop() method is deprecated. It forces the thread to stop executing.

Option D is wrong. Is the main entry point for an application.




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