Ken Squier Death and Obituary, What Happened to Ken Squier? How Did Vermont Broadcast Legend Ken Squier Die? Who was Ken Squier?

Iconic NASCAR broadcaster Ken Squier passed away at 88, leaving a void in the racing world, explore the details surrounding Ken Squier's cause of death and his enduring legacy as the "Voice of NASCAR.

by Alaguvelan M

Updated Nov 17, 2023

Advertisement
Ken Squier Death and Obituary, What Happened to Ken Squier? How Did Vermont Broadcast Legend Ken Squier Die? Who was Ken Squier?
Fresherslive

What Happened to Ken Squier?

Ken Squier, the beloved NASCAR announcer and broadcaster, passed away at the age of 88 in Waterbury, Vermont, where he also owned WDEV radio. Although he never raced himself, Squier made significant contributions to NASCAR's growth, earning praise from NASCAR's chairman and CEO, Jim France, as a superb storyteller.

Article continues below advertisement

Best known for coining the phrase 'The Great American Race,' Squier's influence extended beyond broadcasting. In 1960, he opened Thunder Road Speedway in Vermont, becoming a legend in his home state.  Vermont Governor Phil Scott, a fellow racer, celebrated Squier as a true icon, emphasizing his contributions to racing and deep community devotion.

NASCAR honored Squier by naming its annual media excellence award after him. Winston Kelley, executive director of the NASCAR Hall of Fame, highlighted Squier's unique ability to connect with fans, describing the human side of NASCAR competitors.

While the racing community mourns Squier's passing, his legacy endures through his impact on the sport and the friendships he forged.

Looking for a reliable source of news and trending stories? Fresherslive has got you covered! Our articles are designed to be reader-friendly, ensuring that you can quickly grasp the latest updates.

Article continues below advertisement

Who was Ken Squier?

Kenley Dean Squier, born on April 10, 1935, in Waterbury, Vermont, was a well-known American sportscaster and motorsports editor. He earned the title of the "Voice of NASCAR" for his detailed commentary on NASCAR races from 1979 to 1997, broadcasting on CBS and TBS.

Article continues below advertisement
Article continues below advertisement

Squier kickstarted his broadcasting journey in the early 1960s in radio and later co-founded the Motor Racing Network (MRN) in 1970, focusing on airing NASCAR races.

In 1979, CBS enlisted Squier as the lap-by-lap commentator, where he gained recognition for his passionate and knowledgeable style. Notable races he covered include the 1979 Daytona 500, the 1992 Winston Cup championship race, and the 1998 Daytona 500.

Squier's dedication extended beyond CBS, as he continued as a NASCAR commentator for TBS until 1999, also serving as a studio host for broadcasts on CBS, TBS, and ESPN. Recognized for his contributions, Squier entered the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America in 2010 and the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2018. 

Article continues below advertisement

How Did Vermont Broadcast Legend Ken Squier Die? Cause of Death Revealed

Vermont broadcast legend Ken Squier, renowned for his influential role in NASCAR, passed away at the age of 88. His death was confirmed by his friend and colleague, Dave Moody, and later by WDEV, the Vermont radio station he owned.

Article continues below advertisement
Article continues below advertisement

Recently placed in hospice care due to health challenges, Squier's impact on NASCAR, especially in the historic 1979 Daytona 500, remains an enduring legacy. Fans and the racing community pay tribute to his remarkable contributions to motorsports.

Ken Squier Obituary

Ken Squier, the iconic NASCAR broadcaster, passed away on Wednesday night at the age of 88, as confirmed by NASCAR on Thursday. Known as the "Voice of NASCAR," Squier began his illustrious career in 1970, calling races on MRN, CBS, and TBS until 1997.

Article continues below advertisement
Article continues below advertisement

His unforgettable moment came during the 1979 Daytona 500 when he famously exclaimed, "And there's a fight," immortalizing the brawl between Cale Yarborough and Bobby Allison.

Born in Waterbury, Vermont, Squier's passion for NASCAR extended beyond the microphone, co-founding MRN and playing a pivotal role in bringing the sport to millions during a historic snowstorm broadcast.

Inducted into the NASCAR Hall of Fame in 2018, Squier's legacy as a storyteller and voice of NASCAR's greatest moments will be deeply missed by the racing community.

Article continues below advertisement



Disclaimer: The above information is for general informational purposes only. All information on the Site is provided in good faith, however we make no representation or warranty of any kind, express or implied, regarding the accuracy, adequacy, validity, reliability, availability or completeness of any information on the Site.

Ken Squier Death And Obituary - FAQs

1. What was the cause of Ken Squier's death?

Ken Squier passed away, and while the exact cause of death has not been publicly disclosed, his death marks a significant loss in the racing community.

2. When did Ken Squier pass away?

Ken Squier passed away on Wednesday night at the age of 88, as confirmed by NASCAR on Thursday.

3. How did Ken Squier contribute to NASCAR before his passing?

Ken Squier, known as the "Voice of NASCAR," played a pivotal role in NASCAR broadcasting, calling races on MRN, CBS, and TBS from 1970 to 1997.

4. What iconic moment is associated with Ken Squier's commentary in NASCAR history?

Ken Squier is famous for his call during the 1979 Daytona 500, where he exclaimed, "And there's a fight," capturing the intense post-race brawl.

5. Was there any specific health condition that led to Ken Squier being in hospice care before his death?

Reports indicate that Ken Squier had been transferred to hospice care due to a number of health difficulties in the period leading up to his passing.

Recent Articles


Advertisement
DMCA.com Protection Status